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    Sulphur Creek Seaplane Base (Rabaul, Simpson Harbor) ENB PNG
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5th AF Nov 2, 1943

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USAAF c1944

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Justin Taylan 2000

Location
Sulphur Creek Seaplane Base was located to the north of Sulphur Creek at Rabaul bordering Simpson Harbor and to the north of Lakunai Airfield. Also known as "Rabaul Seaplane Base" or "Simpson Harbor Seaplane Base". Seaplane takeoffs and landings were made in Simpson Harbor. Other seaplane and flyingboat anchorages at Simpson Harbor were Matupi Seaplane Base and Malaguna Seaplane Base. Today located in East New Britain Province in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

Construction
On January 23, 1942 occupied by the Japanese when they captured Rabaul. During early 1942, the Japanese built a large rectangular concrete seaplane ramp and apron at this location to service flying boats and seaplanes.

World War II Pacific Theatre History
Used by the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) as a seaplane base and servicing area. During the Pacific War, used by H6K Mavis and H8K Emily. During 1942-1943 four engined flyingboats operated a regular service northward via Truk and Saipan to Japan. Also used by single engine seaplanes including E13A1 Jakes and F1M2 Petes.

Japanese units operating from Rabaul Seaplane Base (Sulphur Creek)
Yokohama Air Corps (H6K Mavis) January 25, 1942

During late 1942 until the end of the war, this area was attacked by Allied fighters and bombers. Several seaplanes and flyingboats were destroyed at the base including an H6K Mavis was abandoned on the on the concrete apron.

American missions against Sulphur Creek
January 27, 1944

January 27, 1944
(13th AF) Two squadrons of B-24's blast concentrations at Sulphur Creek.

Postwar
During the late 1950s, David Bremen had a house built on former seaplane ramp.

Rod Pearce adds:
"As a child in during the late 1950s, I recall swimming on the wreck of a seaplane at this location, possibly a Jake."

Today
The concrete seaplane ramp remained until the 1994 volcanic eruption, when it was covered in ash.

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Last Updated
April 7, 2020

 

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