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August 1945
Today in World War II Pacific History
Day by day chronology

WEDNESDAY, 1 AUGUST 1945

THURSDAY, 2 AUGUST 1945

FRIDAY, 3 AUGUST 1945

SATURDAY, 4 AUGUST 1945

SUNDAY, 5 AUGUST 1945

MONDAY, 6 AUGUST 1945

TUESDAY, 7 AUGUST 1945

WEDNESDAY, 8 AUGUST 1945

THURSDAY, 9 AUGUST 1945

FRIDAY, 10 AUGUST 1945

SATURDAY, 11 AUGUST 1945

ALEUTIAN ISLANDS (Eleventh Air Force): The 11th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group moves from Adak to Shemya with P-38s.

Fourteenth Air Force: Nine P-51s attack troops, trains, and rivercraft around Chenhsien, Tehsien, and Hengyang; and the 115th Liaison Squadron, Fourteenth AF, based at Hsingchiang with L-1, L-4s and L-5s, begins operating primarily from Peishiyi.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: In Japan, Okinawa-based B-24s, B-25s, A-26s, A-20s, and fighters flying about 530 sorties cause extensive destruction to shipping and shore installations in the Inland Sea, in the Tsushima area, and of communications, transportation, and other targets throughout Kyushu. Philippines based B-24s bomb Heito Airfield and Laha barracks Ambon. P-38s hit buildings near Dibuluan and field guns near Kiangan on Luzon. The 400th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 90th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from San Jose, Mindoro to Ie Shima with B-24s.

IJN: The Japanese Navy attempted a second test flight of J9Y Kikka Prototype 1 with Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) units under each wing. The RATO unit's alignment were miscalculated and the test pilot believed that they had not fired and shut off the main engines. Powered by the rockets, the Kikka ran off the runway and crash, tearing off the landing gear and crashed into Tokyo Bay. The damaged aircraft could not be repaired before the end of the Pacific War. Sunk by mine is Nisshin Maru No. 2 off Wakamatsu.

SUNDAY, 12 AUGUST 1945

ALEUTIAN ISLANDS (Eleventh Air Force): Four B-24s make a combined visual and radar bomb run over Kataoka. Three B-24s bomb Suribachi Airfield, hitting runways and buildings. A B-24 flies a radar-ferret mission.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: B-24s from Okinawa bomb Matsuyama Airfield. In Japan, B-25s and A-26s hit Chiran Airfield and Kanoya Airfield while other A-26s and A-20s and P-47s hit the towns of Kushikino, Akune, and Miyazaki; more B-25s and fighter-bombers hit shipping and communications targets on Kyushu, the N Ryukyu Islands, and between Japan and Korea; the aircraft claim several small merchant ships sunk and damaged, and numerous bridges, railroads, factories, and other targets of opportunity hit. B-24s from the Philippines pound Kagi Airfield and the Takao marshalling yard. On Luzon, P-38s support ground forces in or near Kabayan, Kiangan, and Uldugan. Unit moves: Air echelon of the 8th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 6th Reconnaissance Group, from Clark Field to Ie Shima with F-5s joining the ground echelon that arrived in Jul; 319th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 90th Bombardment Group (Heavy), from San Jose to Ie Shima with B-24s; 387th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 312th Bombardment Group (Heavy), from Floridablanca to Okinawa with A-20s; and 529th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 380th Bombardment Group (Heavy), from San Jose to Okinawa with B-24s.

MONDAY, 13 AUGUST 1945

TUESDAY, 14 AUGUST 1945

JAPAN - Japanese Emperor Hirohito assembles Imperial Council and decides to accept unconditional surrender. Allies prepare to occupy Japan.

Twentieth Air Force: 752 B-29s fly 7 missions against Japan without loss. These are the last B-29 missions against Japan in WWII. The following 3 missions were flown during the day:
Mission 325: 157 B-29s bomb the naval arsenal at Hikari; 4 others hit alternate targets.
Mission 326: 145 B-29s bomb the Osaka Army Arsenal and 2 hit alternate targets; 160+ P-51 escort the B-29s and attack airfields in the Nagoya area; 1 P-51 is lost.
Mission 327: 108 B-29s bomb the railroad yards at Marifu; 2 others hit alternate targets. The following 4 missions were flown during the night of 14/15 Aug:
Mission 328: In the longest nonstop unstaged B-29 mission from the Mariana Islands, 3,650 miles (5,874 km), 132 B-29s bomb the Nippon Oil Company at Tsuchizakiminato. Mission 329: 81 B-29s drop incendiaries on the Kumagaya urban area destroying 0.27 sq mi (0.7 sq km), 45% of the city area.
Mission 330: 86 B-29s drop incendiaries on the Isezaki urban area destroying 0.166 sq mi (0.43 sq km), 17% of the city area.
Mission 331: 39 B-29s mine the waters at Nanao, Shimonoseki, Miyazu, and Hamada. Before the last B-29s return, President Harry S. Truman announces the unconditional surrender of Japan. Immediately thereafter, the 11th Airborne Division leaves the Philippine Islands by air for Okinawa, where it goes on standby as the initial occupation force for Japan.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: B-25s, P-47s, and P-51s attack shipping in Korea and Kyushu waters, claiming several vessels destroyed and damaged. P-47s over the Osaka-Nagoya area claim several Japanese aircraft shot down. The 19th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 22d Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Clark Field to Okinawa with B-24s.

RAAF - Lost is B-25D Mitchell A47-37.

WEDNESDAY, 15 AUGUST 1945

CENTRAL PACIFIC [US Army Strategic Air Forces in the Pacific (USASTAF)]: All offensive action against Japan ends.

CHINA THEATER (AAF, China Theater): All offensive action against Japan ends

Fourteenth Air Force: HQ 81st Fighter Group and 91st Fighter Squadron move from Fungwansham to Huhsien, China with P-47s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: All offensive action against Japan ends. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur is notified that he is Supreme Commander for Allied powers. MacArthur tries to communicate with Tokyo using the War Department signal facilities, but when he receives no reply, he turns to the Army Airways Communications System (AACS), Manila station call sign WXXU, transmitted MacArthur's instructions to the Japanese using a frequency over which AACS had been broadcasting uncoded weather information. The first message to Japan read:

"From Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers To The Japanese Emperor, the Japanese Imperial Government, the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters Message Number Z-500 I have been designated as the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (the United States, the Republic of China, the United Kingdom and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) and empowered to arrange directly with the Japanese authorities for the cessation of hostilities at the earliest practicable date. It is desired that a radio station in the Tokyo area be officially designated for continuous use in handling radio communications between this headquarters and your headquarters. Your reply to this message should give the call signs, frequencies and station designation. It is desired that the radio communication with my headquarters in Manila be handled in English text. Pending designation by you of a station in the Tokyo area for use as above indicated, station JUM on frequency 13705 kilocycles will be used for this purpose and Manila will reply on 15965 kilocycles. Upon receipt of this message, acknowledge. Signed MacArthur."

In less than two hours, a reply from Tokyo was received, the first direct communication between the Allies and Japan.

Unit moves: HQ 22d Bombardment Group and 33d Bombardment Squadron from Clark Field to Okinawa with B-24s; 66th Troop Carrier Squadron, 403d Troop Carrier Group, from Morotai to Dulag with C-46s; 160th Liaison Squadron, 3d Air Commando Group [attached to 5th Air Liaison Group (Provisional)], from Mabalacat to Ie Shima with UC-64s and L-5s; 321st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 90th Bombardment Group (Heavy), from San Jose to Ie Shima with B-24s; 531st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) from San Jose to Okinawa with B-24s; and 674th Bombardment Squadron, 417th Bombardment Group from San Jose to Okinawa with A-20s.

(USN) At 0635, Admiral Halsey sent a message to his forces announcing the end of hostilities and ordering the cessation of offensive air operations, the first carrier strike of the day had already hit Tokyo and the second was approaching the coastline as it was recalled.

IJN: After the Emperor made the radio announcement that Japan would surrender, a final kamikaze attack by ten aircraft was planned against U. S. Navy warships off Okinawa. After take off, three aborted due to engine problems. All seven attacking aircraft were shot down. Lost was D4Y Judy commanded by Vice-Admiral Matome Ugaki (KIA).

THURSDAY, 16 AUGUST 1945

CHINA THEATER (AAF, China Theater) Tenth Air Force: In China, the detachments of the 427th Night Fighter Squadron, Tenth AF, operating from Chengkung and Nanning with P-61s return to base at Liuchow.

Fourteenth Air Force: Unit moves in China: 1st Combat Cargo Squadron, Fourteenth AF (attached to 69th Composite Wing), from Hsinching to Chengkung with C-47s; detachments of 21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Fourteenth AF at Laifeng returns to base at Shwangliu and a flight begins operating from Chihkiang, all with F-5s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Unit moves to Okinawa: HQ 49th Fighter Group and 9th Fighter Squadron from Lingayen Airfield with P-38s; 5th and 6th Combat Cargo Squadrons, 2d Combat Cargo Group, from Dulag with C-46s. Lost on a flight is B-25 44-31361 (MIA).

FRIDAY, 17 AUGUST 1945

CHINA - Fourteenth Air Force: Unit moves in China: 91st Fighter Squadron, 81st Fighter Group, from Fungwanshan to Huhsien with P-47s; detachment of the 426th Night Fighter Squadron, Fourteenth AF (attached to 312th Fighter Wing), at Hsian returns to base at Shwangliu with P-61s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Unit moves to Okinawa: 417th Bombardment Group, HQ, 672d and 675th Bombardment Squadrons from San Jose with A-20s; 7th and 8th Fighter Squadrons, 49th Fighter Group, from Lingayen Airfield with P-38s. On a photographic mission over Tokyo, a formation of B-32 Dominators is intercepted by Japanese fighters, damaging B-32 42-108539.

SATURDAY, 18 AUGUST 1945

SUNDAY, 19 AUGUST 1945

CHINA - Fourteenth Air Force: Unit moves in China: 16th Fighter Squadron, 51st Fighter Group from Chengkung to Nanning with P-51s (the detachment at Pakhoi also moves to Nanning); detachment of 426th Night Fighter Squadron, Fourteenth AF (attached to 312th Fighter Wing), at Liangshan returns to base at Shwangliu with P-61s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: On August 19, 1945, two B-25Js of the 345th BG and 80th FS P-38 Lightings escort two "Betty" bombers. The Japanese aircraft carry a delegation from Tokyo via Ie Shima then aboard an American aircaft to Manila for a meeting with General MacArthur's staff to work out details of the surrender. The Betty bombers are painted all white with green crosses on the wings, fuselage and vertical tail surface and use the call signs "Bataan I" and "Bataan II". The deligation lands at Ie Shima Airfield and are then flown aboard a C-54 to Manila. After the meeting, they returned to Ie Shima Airfield. One of the two Bettys crashed on its way back to Japan out of fuel, due to conversion of a liter were mistaken from the gallon. The crew was helped by local fisherman, and returnted to Tokyo by train. The co-pilot was Rinpei Komai, who is still alive today.

MONDAY, 20 AUGUST 1945

CHINA - Fourteenth Air Force: The 92d Fighter Squadron, 81st Fighter Group, moves from Fungwanshan to Huhsien, China with P-47s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 2d Combat Cargo Group and 7th and 8th Combat Cargo Squadrons move from Dulag to Bolo Airfield with C-46s.

IJN: G4M1 Betty "Bataan 1" force lands off the coast of Japan after returning from Ie Shima Airfield with surrender delegation.

USSR/IJA: On Shumshu Island, a cease fire is signed ending the fighting between Soviet forces and the defending Japanese.

TUESDAY, 21 AUGUST 1945

ALEUTIAN ISLANDS (Eleventh Air Force): Two B-24s are prevented by cloud cover from taking photos of the Soviet occupation of the Kurile Islands; four others abort a photo mission to Paramushiru and Shimushu due to weather.

Tenth Air Force: The 71st Liaison Squadron, Tenth AF, moves from Kunming to Liuchow with UC-64s, L-1s and L-5s.

Fourteenth Air Force: The detachment of the 426th Night Fighter Squadron, Fourteenth AF (attached to 312th Fighter Wing), operating from Ankang, China with P-61s, returns to base at Shwangliu.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The 408th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 22d Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Clark Field, Luzon to Okinawa with B-24s.

WEDNESDAY, 22 AUGUST 1945

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: C-47 units arriving on Okinawa from Hawaii: 311th Troop Carrier Squadron, US Army Forces, Middle Pacific; and 316th Troop Carrier Squadron, Seventh AF.

THURSDAY, 23 AUGUST 1945

ALEUTIAN ISLANDS (Eleventh Air Force): Four B-24s fly a photo mission over Paramushiru and Shimushu.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 310th Bombardment Wing (Medium), Fifth AF, moves from San Jose, Mindoro to Clark Field.

RAF: Lost is B-24 "Snake" KL-654 (MIA).

IJA: On Shumshu Island the remaining Japanese officially surrendered to Soviet forces, ending the last battle of World War II in the Pacific.

FRIDAY, 24 AUGUST 1945

ALEUTIAN ISLANDS (Eleventh Air Force): B-24s try to photograph the Soviet occupation of the Kurile Islands but are impeded by clouds.

CHINA THEATER (AAF, China Theater) Tenth Air Force: C-47 unit moves: 2d Troop Carrier Squadron, 443d Troop Carrier Group, from Dinjan to Chihkiang, China; 322d Troop Carrier Squadron, Tenth AF, from Liangshan to Chihkiang, China.

Fourteenth Air Force: The 76th Fighter Squadron, 23d Fighter Group, moves from Luliang to Liuchow with P-51s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 317th Troop Carrier Group moves from Clark Field to Okinawa.

SATURDAY, 25 AUGUST 1945

CHINA THEATER (AAF, China Theater)

Tenth Air Force: C-47 units moving to Luliang: 3d and 4th Combat Cargo Squadrons, 1st Combat Cargo Group (under operational control of HQ 69th Composite Wing), from Myitkyina and Hathazari, India respectively.

Fourteenth Air Force: The 118th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Fourteenth AF, moves from Laohwangping to Liuchow with F-6s.

WESTERN PACIFIC [Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Unit moves: 68th and 69th Troop Carrier Squadrons, 433d Troop Carrier Group, from Clark Field, Luzon to Iwo Jima with C-46s and C-47s respectively; 318th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando), 3d Air Commando Group, from Laoag, Luzon to Ie Shima with C-47s.

SUNDAY, 26 AUGUST 1945

WESTERN PACIFIC: The 70th Troop Carrier Squadron, 433d Troop Carrier Group, moves from Clark Field to Iwo Jima with C-46s.

MONDAY, 27 AUGUST 1945

CENTRAL PACIFIC Twentieth Air Force: B-29s begin supplying prisoners-of-war and internee camps in Japan, China, and Korea with medical supplies, food, and clothing. The first supply drop (to Weihsien Camp near Peking) is followed by a concentrated effort of 900 sorties in a period of less than a month. 4,470 tons of supplies are dropped to about 63,500 prisoners in 154 camps.

WESTERN PACIFIC: Unit moves: HQ XIII Bomber Command from Morotai to Clark Field; and 67th Troop Carrier Squadron, 433d Troop Carrier Group, from Clark Field to Iwo Jima with C-46s.

TUESDAY, 28 AUGUST 1945

CHINA: HQ 443d Troop Carrier Group and 1st Troop Carrier Squadron move from Dinjan to Chihkiang, China with C-47s.

WESTERN PACIFIC: The occupation of Japan officially begins as an advance party arrives in the Home Islands. When the news of the Japanese proposal for surrender came on August 15, the 68th Army Airways Communications System (AACS) Group, 7th AACS Wing, received orders to fly into Atsugi Airfield and set up the communications equipment necessary to guide in the first contingent of occupation troops. AACSs mission was to provide navigational aids, point-to-point communications with Okinawa, air-to-ground communications for planes in flight, weather data, and air traffic control. Colonel Gordon Blake quickly assembled a special unit of 5 hand-picked men. Colonel Blake and his AACS men, part of a 150 man task force, flew from Okinawa to Atsugi with 24 C-47 aircraft laden with equipment. In order to carry as much equipment as possible, the load was lightened by carrying only enough fuel to reach Atsugi. Although the Japanese had surrendered unconditionally, Blake and his communicators still did not know whether some might still be hostile. The sight of hundreds of Japanese Navy guards lined up along the airfield was not encouraging to the occupants of the first aircraft to land, but they were met by a group of courteous, English-speaking Japanese military personnel. The navy guards were in their honor. The AACS-men lost no time in getting operations into full swing, and by 29 Aug, the Atsugi control tower was completed. The first planes to arrive on 30 Aug were 5 additional C-47s carrying components to set up the first airborne radio station in Air Force history. Within a few hours, the first C-54 aircraft of the official occupation forces landed at Atsugi and by mid-afternoon Blake's AACS crews had directed 340+ takeoffs and landings at the rate of 1 every 2 minutes. By August 30, Atsugi was the busiest airport in the world.

FEAF: Crashed on take off is B-32 42-108544. Also lost is B-32 42-108528 (11 crew rescued, two MIA)

RNZAF: A PBY Catalina of 6 Squadron went to Rekata Bay for a picnic and to inspect the former Japanese base. On this visit, one member of the group LAC Leslie Angus Ellen, NZ441559 went missing. It was beileved he drown or was taken by a saltwater crocodile. He is memorialized on the tablet of the missing, panel 7 at Borail Memorial.

WEDNESDAY, 29 AUGUST 1945

General MacArthur is appointed supreme commander of the Allied occupying force in Japan

Major Gregory "Pappy" Boyington, famed leader of the Black Sheep Squadron is freed from a POW camp in Japan.  Boyington had been shot down over Rabaul two years earlier.

(20th AF) On a mission to air drop supplies to Konan Camp B-29 "Hog Wild" 44-70136 is shot down by Soviet fightters. The crew survived and were interrned by Soveit forces until September 16, 1945.

THURSDAY, 30 AUGUST 1945

Tenth Air Force: HQ 1st Combat Cargo Group moves from Myitkyina to Liuchow.

Japan - The occupation of Japan in force begins when the US Army 11th Airborne Division is flown to Atsugi Airfield and US Marines land at Yokosuka Naval Base. The 159th Liaison Squadron (Commando), 3d Air Commando Group [attached to 5th Air Liaison Group (Provisional)] moves from Mangaldan to Okinawa with UC-64s and L-5s.

RAAF - Crashed during take off from Darwin Harbor is PBY A24-1.

FRIDAY, 31 AUGUST 1945

The Japanese garrison at Marcus surrenders to American General Whiting.

USN: Crashed in Oregon is SB2C Helldiver 21078 killing the crew.



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